Lee Troop and Hanny Allston triumph in inaugural Hobart Run the Bridge

The inaugural Hobart Run the Bridge was won today by interstate athlete Lee Troop, and Tasmanian Hanny Allston.

Troop covered the hilly 10 kilometre course in a time of 29minutes 41 seconds, finishing ahead of Shane Nankervis and Mark Tucker.

Troop smashed predications that the hilly course would be difficult to run under 30 minutes.

“I made the call that the race would be decided by the top of the bridge, and I think from that point it was,” he said.

Asked about his tactics for the race, Troop said “the gun went off, and I ran like I stole something.”

Runners at start line of Hobart run the Bridge

Runners at start line of Hobart run the Bridge

World champion orienteer Hanny Allston won the women’s event in a time of 35minutes and 24 seconds, followed by two other Tasmanians: event ambassador and Olympic steeplechaser Donna MacFarlane, and Australian 3000 metre champion Mel Daniels.

Allston said she was happy with her time and enjoyed the course.

“Yeah it was good, it’s so scenic, but obviously it was tough with the hills,” she said.

The event began at Bellerive Oval, before taking runners across the Hobart bridge, where lanes of traffic were closed for the first time for a running race.

The event then passed through Hobart’s waterfront before finishing in Salamanca place.

Over 1300 runners and walkers took part in the event, which supported the charity Variety.

World champion axeman David Foster and former Australian cricketer David Boon led walking teams in the event.

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On campus study beats correspondence for balancing family life

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Balancing university with family can be difficult, but on campus beats correspondence, according to two students.

Aislinn Brewitt decided to study on campus after finding correspondence difficult.

“Studying by correspondence requires so much discipline and if you don’t understand a lecture it can be difficult to contact the tutor,” Ms Brewitt said.

“On campus, the only down side for me is working the lectures in around my children,” she said.

Olivia Trueman is studying on campus, and also has a young child whose needs she has to balance with her study.

Ms Trueman said studying on campus full time has been quite inflexible, but that Griffith’s new stream lining system will hopefully make it easier.

“This will be better and give me more time for myself, work, my child and other commitments,” Ms Trueman said.

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On campus study beats correspondence for balancing family life

(300 word version)

student

A balancing act: study and life's other commitments

Balancing university with family can be difficult, but on campus beats correspondence, according to two students.

Aislinn Brewitt studied a Bachelor of Communication through Open Universities Australia for almost three years before deciding to transfer to on-campus study.

“I found studying by correspondence very difficult. At the time it fit my life as I had two very young children at home with me and I could study at night whilst they slept,” Ms Brewitt said.

“I decided to go on campus as I believe it will benefit me later in life, networking with others in the industry,” she said.

“Also, I feel I will learn more as I’m much more visual and having things explained to me makes it easier to absorb,” Ms Brewitt said.

Ms Brewitt will study the same degree at the University of Western Sydney, and said she expects she will get a lot more guidance.

“Studying by correspondence requires so much discipline and if you dont understand a lecture it can be difficult to contact the tutor, and can be frustrating,” Ms Brewitt said.

Student using computer outside

The typical study by correspondence advertisement: the flexibility to study when and where you like

“On campus, the only down side for me is working the lectures in around my children, trying to get all my tutorials in on the days my son is at pre-school,” she said.

Olivia Trueman is a Griffith University student studying a Bachelor of Laws on campus, and also has a young child whose needs she has to balance with her study.

Ms Trueman said studying on campus full time has been quite inflexible and made it difficult to balance family, paid employment and other commitments.

“Griffith has just introduced stream lining for lectures and tutorials, so I’m hoping this year I’ll have my subjects on two days a week,” Ms Trueman said.

“This will be better and give me more time for myself, work, my child and other commitments,” she said.

Ms Trueman said she did not know much about correspondence study, and thought on campus was the only option for her degree.

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Tasmanian athlete Ryan Foster breaks Australian indoor 800m record

Ryan Foster competing

Ryan Foster (right) racing in the US

(300 word version)

Tasmanian athlete Ryan Foster has broken the Australian indoor 800m record, which has stood for 41 years.

Foster won the race at the Penn State National Meet in the United States on the weekend, his time of 1:47.48 four tenths of a second faster than the previous record set by Olympic gold medalist Ralph Doubell in 1968.

Foster said he knew he could do a good time, but predicts he might even be able to go faster.

“The race went nearly perfectly. In hindsight I didn’t press hard enough once [my pacemaker] Kevin stepped off the track,” Foster said.

“I can definitely go faster by working a little harder earlier,” he said.

Foster’s time meets the qualifying standard for the world indoor championships, although it falls outside the qualifying period.

This is the second national record for Foster this year, after he ran 2:19.60 over 1000m in January.

Foster is on a scholarship at Penn State University, and trains under coach John Gondak.

He said his training has been different to that in Tasmania, that he is more relaxed about training now, and has full trust in his coach.

“I do a lot more aerobic work, and less workouts,” Foster said.

“I used to need to write everything down, and then always strive to beat past workouts. Now I just have faith that Gondak is going to get it right,” he said.

“I attribute my performances now to all of the work that I have done over the last seven or eight years,” Foster said.

“I am finally starting to realize the results of the hard work I have been putting in. I think just physically maturing has also helped,” he said.

Foster said he is now aiming for the Commonwealth Games and Olympics.

“Commonwealth Games is a little difficult because the trials fall during my school year, but I am working on a way to be able to return home and run them,” he said.

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Tasmanian athlete Ryan Foster breaks Australian indoor 800m record

(100 word version)

Tasmanian athlete Ryan Foster has broken the Australian indoor 800m record, which has stood for 41 years.

Foster won the race at the Penn State National Meet in the United States on the weekend, his time of 1:47.48 four tenths of a second faster than the previous record set by Olympic gold medalist Ralph Doubell in 1968.

Foster, who is on a scholarship at Penn State University, said he knew he could do a good time, but predicts he might even be able to go faster.

“The race went nearly perfectly. In hindsight I didn’t press hard enough once [my pacemaker] Kevin stepped off the track,” Foster said.

“I can definitely go faster by working a little harder earlier,” he said.

This is the second national record for Foster this year, after he ran 2:19.60 over 1000m in January.

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New mothers at risk on road

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Sleep deprived new mothers have been compared to drink drivers when it comes to their ability to control a motor vehicle.

Researchers from the Queensland University of Technology’s (QUT) studied 24 new mothers to determine the effect of post-partum fatigue on their driving.

Dr Kerry Armstrong, from QUT, said new mothers are at risk behind the wheel from sleep deprivation.

“Research has shown that if someone’s awake for 17 hours, it can be similar to having a blood alcohol content of 0.05 per cent,” she said.

“If they’ve been awake for 24 hours, it’s similar to being two times over the limit,” Dr Armstrong said.

Dr Armstrong said the research showed that where previous research only showed fatigue effects up to six weeks post-partum, their research showed mothers could be effected for 12 weeks, and even up to years.

Word count: 137

Based on this story  http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/1005527/new-mums-drive-in-a-haze-study

Study exercise was to find an online news story, and ‘role play’ the interview with a friend or family member, having them play the role of the interviewee, and me as the interviewer. Therefore all comments in this post are not those of Dr Kerry Armstrong – they have been made up for the purposes of this study task.

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New mothers at risk on road

(Week 4 tutorial task)

300 word version

Sleep deprived new mothers have been compared to drink drivers when it comes to their ability to control a motor vehicle.

Researchers from Queensland University of Technology’s (QUT) Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety studied 24 new mothers from southeast Queensland to determine the effect of post-partum fatigue on their driving.

Dr Kerry Armstrong, from QUT, said new mothers are at risk behind the wheel from sleep deprivation.

“Previous research has shown that that post-partum fatigue should disappear after six weeks, but we’ve found that the new mothers still felt exhausted 12weeks after giving birth”, Dr Armstrong said.

“And of course all parents will tell you that they can have interrupted sleep patterns for a lot longer than that – up to years,” she said.

“To put it in context, research has shown that if someone’s awake for 17 hours, it can be similar to having a blood alcohol content of 0.05 per cent”, Dr Armstrong said.

“Then, if they’ve been awake for 24 hours, it’s similar to being two times over the limit, or 0.1 percent”, Dr Armstrong said.

Dr Armstrong said the study also showed new mothers often showed a decreased awareness of their body’s need for rest, and the safety implications of fatigue.

“New mums tend to push through the tiredness to get things done that need to be done: looking after the baby, washing, cooking and so on,” Dr Armstrong said.

“It’s clear that new mums need to be more aware of the risks of post-partum fatigue,” she said.

Dr Armstrong said the research would be used to help develop ways to help new mums with this situation and raise awareness of post-partum fatigue and the safety implications, including brochures and other intervention methods.

Word count: 289

Based on this story  http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/1005527/new-mums-drive-in-a-haze-study

Study exercise was to find an online news story, and ‘role play’ the interview with a friend or family member, having them play the role of the interviewee, and me as the interviewer. Therefore all comments in this post are not those of Dr Kerry Armstrong – they have been made up for the purposes of this study task.

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